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For my multimodal project I will create a photo essay in which I will present my development as a writer. I will start with photos that will represent my earliest memories about writing- my first attempts on writing. I will then use photos to show how starting school helped me develop and how I started writing my first essays. I will associate that early writing with feelings like excitement or fun. Next, I will move up to a stage when I had to write longer essays and how sometimes I had to struggle with them. This part of the photo essay will also have pictures of my first attempts of writing in English, when I moved from Poland to the United States. It was a big change for me because I did not know the language very well, so I basically had to start writing from the very basics again. This part will be associated with feelings like stress and confusion. Then I will move up to a period of time when I became more comfortable with my writing. I won second place in middle school in a writing contest and when I went to high school I had a great English teacher. This really made me more confident in my writing and improved my writing skills. This stage will be associated with feelings like confidence, but also still stress. Lastly I would like to include a few photos that represent our WRD class because I was exposed to new ways of creating writing pieces. Even this multimodal project is completely something new and I believe it changes me as a writer as well.

The first newspaper in the United States, the Boston News-Letter appeared for the first time in 1704. Since then, many papers came out in print and many of them are still printed today. The New York Times was first printed in 1851 and is still has one of the highest circulations on the market. Every day millions of people pick it up from their doorsteps and unfold the pile of pages. Today more and more people, however, decide to read the paper online and with ‘one click’ access the whole newspaper on their computers, iPhones, and other mobile devices. Many people argue whether newspapers that appear in print are still useful; should we read the print or digital version of the New York Times? I will argue that reading the digital version of the New York Times is more convenient and appropriate in this “technology era”.

For example, the reader does not have to flip through so many pages to find articles that interest her.  Instead she can simply click on the section online that appeals to her and look up the topic that she would like to read about. Also, since the articles online are archived, if at any point the reader wants to go back to an article that she has read, she can simply type in the key words and find the needed article. She does not have to keep stacks of newspapers and go through them every single time she needs to find a good article. Everything being “just a click away” makes the digital version much more appealing and convenient.

We live in the 21st century, where most things are already high-tech, the internet is accessible almost everywhere, and so many things are available online. Why not take advantage of all those resources? We should move along with the newest trends and make the digital version of The New York Times more accessible to everyone and promote it more than the print version. The information you receive, whether in print or digital, is the same, so why not get it quickly and conveniently, instead of having to wait for the paper and then looking through the huge stack of gray pages?

The audience of the liberal New York Times is mostly high-end business people, people of higher class and higher education. Many of them, due to their occupation, have to travel a lot. The digital version can be accessed through the internet anywhere in the world. This increases the number of readers, because more people are likely to subscribe if they know they will be able to read their favorite newspaper anywhere they go. If they only had the paper subscription, they would not be able to read their paper if they travel away from their house.

Moreover, if you decide to subscribe for a paper edition of the New York Times, you need to have a good relationship with your neighbors. Waking up in the morning and not finding the paper on your doorsteps can be very disappointing. And some neighbors do not hesitate to steal your newspaper. By subscribing to the digital version of New York Times you can easily avoid that problem. Being able to read the newspaper online just make life easier.

Another reason as to why a digital version would be better than a paper version of the NYT is the recent issue on recycling and “going green”. Every day millions of paper copies of the newspaper are printed, tons of paper is consumed, and a lot of it is never recycled. If we read only the digital version of New York Times we could save millions of dollars and millions of trees.

In addition, the development of the digital newspapers is expanding. More and more newspapers offer a digital option. Newspapers improve their websites and make them more accessible and easy to use every day. Also, the fact that such a great newspaper like the New York Times just created an application for the iPhone shows that there is demand for the digital version of the paper. People want access on demand, without having to flip a bunch of huge pages. Scrolling down the screen of their computer or phone is much more convenient and faster.

Since the New York Times is on the Web for over ten years, it shows that the newspaper is trying to reach out to its audience and moves with the newest trends. Also, it means that the online version must be bringing profit for the company because otherwise it would not be around for such a long period of time. Even though there might be periods of downtime, as stated in the following YouTube video, young people still prefer to read the digital version of The New York Times:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMn3SaFUdQQ&feature=related

Many people can argue that the paper version has historical value and that is why we should stick with it. However I oppose to that because in a way, the New York Times has more historical information in its digital form. You can access articles from as far back as 1851 and I doubt that a lot of people keep a paper version of the New York Times from that year. It is very easy to find any articles on a given topic just by typing in what you are looking for. For example, when you type in “print vs. digital” in the search box on the New York Times website, a number of related articles show up in less than a second. You do not have to look through a ton of newspapers to find just the right article.

It seems that there are a lot of arguments that will stand for promoting the digital version of newspapers. In today’s era of fast internet and great technology, digital is just better and more efficient. Everything is digital today, even colleges offer online classes, everything is available online, a lot of classrooms do not use paper anymore. And if someone asked you which word does not belong in this group: technology-internet-print-digital, I think the answer would be obvious.

 

 

Works Cited:

Newspapers Struggle Online. Reuters Video. April 24, 2007. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMn3SaFUdQQ&feature=related&gt;

 

 

First newspaper in the United States, the Boston News-Letter appeared for the first time in 1704. Since then, many papers came out in print and many of them are still printed today. New York Times was first printed in 1851 and is still one of the strongest newspapers on the market. Every day millions of people pick it up from their doorsteps and unfold the pile of pages. Today more and more people, however, decide to read the paper online and with ‘one click’ access the whole newspaper on their computers, iPhones, etc. Many people argue whether newspapers that appear in print are still useful; should we read the print or digital version of the New York Times?

I will argue that it is more productive and convenient to read the digital version of the newspaper. The reader does not have to flip through so many pages to find articles that interest him.  Instead he can simply click on the section online that appeals to him and look up the topic that he would like to read about. Also, since the articles online are archived, if at any point the reader wants to go back to an article that he has read, he can simply type in the key words and find the needed article. He does not have to keep stacks of newspapers and go through them every single time he needs to find a good article. Everything being “just a click away” makes the digital version much more appealing and convenient.

We live in the 21st century, where most things are already high-tech, internet is accessible almost everywhere, and so many things are available online. Why not take advantage of all those resources. We should move along with the newest trends and make the digital version of New York Times more accessible to everyone and promote it more than the print version. The information you receive, whether in print or digital, is the same, so why not get it quickly and easily, instead of having to wait for the paper and then looking through the huge stack of gray pages.

In order to have a good experience with your paper subscription, you have to have a good relationship with your neighbors. Waking up in the morning and not finding the paper on your doorsteps can be very disappointing. And some neighbors do not hesitate to steal your newspaper. By subscribing to the digital version of New York Times you can easily avoid that problem. Also, for some students it was a hassle to finally get their newspaper delivered to their dorm, many still did not succeed. Being able to read the newspaper online just make life easier.

The audience of the liberal New York Times is mostly high-end businessmen, people of higher class and higher education. Many of them, due to their occupation, have to travel a lot. The digital version can be accessed through the internet anywhere in the world. This increases the number of costumers, because more people are likely to subscribe if they know they will be able to read their favorite newspaper anywhere they go. If they only had the paper subscription, they would not be able to read their paper if they travel away from their house.

Another reason as to why a digital version would be better than a paper version of the NYT is the recent issue on recycling and “going green”. Every day millions of paper copies of the newspaper are printed, tons of paper is consumed, and a lot of it is never recycled. If we read only the digital version of New York Times we could save millions of dollars and millions of trees.

Since the NYT is on the Web for over ten years, it shows that the newspaper is trying to reach out to its audience and moves with the newest trends. Also, it means that the online version must be bringing profit for the company because otherwise it would not be around for such a long period of time. Even though there might be periods of downtime, as stated in the following YouTube video, young people still prefer to read the digital version of The New York Times:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMn3SaFUdQQ&feature=related

In addition, the development of the digital newspapers shows that it is what people want to read. Newspapers improve their websites and make them more accessible and easy to use every day. Also, the fact that such a great newspaper like the New York Times just created an application for the iPhone shows that there is demand for the digital version of the paper. People want to have it easy and want to be able to have access to their newspaper wherever they go, without having to flip a bunch of huge pages. Scrolling down the screen of their computer or phone is much more convenient and faster.

Many people can argue that the paper version has historical value and that is why we should stick with it. However I will oppose to that because in a way, the New York Times has more historical information in its digital form. You can access articles from as far back as 1851 and I doubt that a lot of people keep a paper version of the NYT from that year. It is very easy to find any articles on a given topic just by typing in what you are looking for. You do not have to look through a ton of newspapers to find just the right article.

In addition, some will also say that the print copy is better for your eyes. However no one will spend hours on reading a newspaper, so their sight cannot be affected that much. Also, sometimes the small font on a print copy is very hard to read, especially when the ink smears all over the place, making your fingers dirty and the article impossible to read.

It seems that there are a lot of arguments that will stand for promoting the digital version of newspapers. In today’s era of fast internet and great technology, digital is just better and more convenient. Everything is digital today, even colleges offer online classes, everything is available online, a lot of classrooms do not use paper anymore. And if someone asked you which word does not belong in this group: technology-internet-print-digital, I think the answer would be obvious.

 

 

Works Cited:

Newspapers Struggle Online. Reuters Video. April 24, 2007. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMn3SaFUdQQ&feature=related&gt;

 

 



First newspaper in the United States, the Boston News-Letter appeared for the first time in 1704. Since then, many papers came out in print and many of them are still printed today. New York Times was first printed in 1851 and is still one of the strongest newspapers on the market. Every day millions of people pick it up from their doorsteps and unfold the pile of pages. Today more and more people, however, decide to read the paper online and with one click access the whole newspaper on their computers, iPhones, etc. Many people argue whether newspapers that appear in print are still useful; should we read the print or digital version of the New York Times?

I will argue that it is more productive and convenient to read the digital version of the newspaper. The reader does not have to flip through so many pages to find articles that interest him.  Instead he can simply click on the section online that appeals to him and look up the topic that he would like to read about. Also, since the articles online are archived, if at any point the reader wants to go back to an article that he has read, he can simply type in the key words and find the needed article. He does not have to keep stacks of newspapers and go through them every single time he needs to find a good article. Everything being “just a click away” makes the digital version much more appealing.

We live in the 21st century, where most things are already high-tech, internet is accessible almost everywhere, and so many things are available online. Why not take advantage of all those resources. We should move along with the newest changes and make the digital version of New York Times more accessible to everyone and promote it more than the print version. The information you receive, whether in print or digital, is the same, so why not get it quickly and easily, instead of having to wait for the paper and then looking through the huge stack of gray pages.

In order to have a good experience with your paper subscription, you have to have a good relationship with your neighbors. Waking up in the morning and not finding the paper on your doorsteps can be very disappointing. But some neighbors just do not hesitate to steal your newspaper. By subscribing to the digital version of New York Times you can easily avoid that problem.

Another reason as to why a digital version would be better than a paper version of the NYT is the recent issue on recycling and “going green”. Everyday millions of paper copies of the newspaper are printed, tons of paper is consumed, and a lot of it is never recycled. If we read only the digital version of New York Times we could save millions of dollars.

Everyone gets some kind of advice as they go off to college. Do this, don’t do that. Try this and that, but stay away from something else. Freshmen hear this all the time. College is a big change for a lot of students, so most of them really listen to everything other people tell them, and try to make the best use of it. Six current post-undergraduate students, decide to also help out and suggest a few strategies for the newcomers. There is no one better to give students advice then students themselves.

All six writers have a different idea of how to make college life perfect. A couple of their ideas may sound a bit extreme to some people, like breaking up with your significant other, because your relationship will not last long in college anyways. Others suggest getting involved, joining organizations, and maybe doing research. Expand your horizons and step out of your comfort zone.  Even though each one of them addresses a different issue, all of them come together to point out that it is important to get to know new people- both students and professors, in and outside the classroom setting. Their goal is to help the students who may be struggling a little with their new college setting by sharing their own experiences and thoughts.

Tim Novikoff appeals to the reader’s humor, while also using style to convey his message. When he advises students of what they should do, he lists a number of things that, in his opinion, are really worth doing in college. He suggests exploring your university, or doing things that you have always wanted to do. By making a list, he adds flow to his piece. It is a quick read, but full of ideas on how to have a great experience in college.

Both Willie X. Lin and Evan LaLonde, advise the freshmen to step out of their comfort zones and face other people. Lin advises to, “meet people who are not professors or other students,” and LaLonde adds, “relax and enjoy the ride.” In their opinion, opening up to other students and people from the outside, is a great idea to get involved and just get used to the new life as a college student and to enjoy the experience.

Christine Smallwood and Rebecca Elliott, the only females in the crowd, argue that letting go of something that we are used to is a great idea to start college fresh and leave obligations behind. Smallwood suggests that separating yourself from the internet for a while can help you be a better student. She says that “by scheduling a few internet-free hours each day,” is the only way to fully concentrate on your work.  Elliot says that it is okay to dump your boyfriend, because it will only stress you out as the year goes by and you start making new friends. Each of the writers has their own different opinion, but all want to help out their younger friends as they start college.

Since all writers are giving tips to college freshmen, it would seem that the audience is in fact college freshmen who may be a little lost or overwhelmed with the new setting. Their own experience as college students establishes credibility and trust. It also creates a student-to-student bond, which makes the audience feel understood because they are looking from the same point of view. Also, the tone of their pieces is understanding and kind, which indicates that they are really trying to share what they know to enhance the college experience of other students, who may be struggling at this point. However, since college students do not usually read the New York Times, the intended audience could be parents of college freshmen. They can influence their children in the decisions they make in college. Since the writers establish a very credible tone, parents would have to problem with taking their advices and passing them down to their kids.

The purpose of this article was to open up the eyes of some college freshmen; to let them know that college is more than just taking classes and studying for them. Either if they read this article themselves, or learn about it through their parents, they can use these tips as they make important choices in college. You have to look around you and see how many opportunities you have, in order to better your college experience. All six writers give their own examples and open you up to new possibilities and now it is the students’ responsibility to take those advices and put them into action.

 

 

Works Cited:

Novikoff, Tim, Willie X. Lin, Aman Singh Gill, Christine Smallwood, Evan LaLonde, and Rebecca Elliot. “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend.” The New York Times 26 Sept. 2010: 12. Print.

 

For my argument/ advocacy essay I decided to take a position in the argument whether we should read the print or digital version of the New York Times. As our technology is improving from year to year and people are getting more familiar with internet, I believe that the online version of the NYT would be more convenient for most people.

Today, a lot of people use internet everyday to shop, communicate, listen to music, read. Almost everything is available online today. In my paper I will argue that having NYT online is of great convenience for many people because they do not have to carry around the big paper and can access it basically anywhere and at any time. Articles in the digital NYT are easy to locate and you can always look them up later on.  Also, with the recent “big deal” with recycling, having the digital New York Times would greatly reduce paper usage. We could save so much paper and money by not printing the paper copies of the NYT. I will also talk about moving forward along with the improving technology and making the best use of it. In the twenty first century we have such an easy access to internet and technology that we should really take advantage of it.

Everyone gets some kind of advices as they go off to college. Do this, don’t do that. Try this and that, but stay away from something else. Freshmen hear that all the time. College is a big change for a lot of students, so most of them really listen to everything other people tell them, and try to make the best use of it. Six current post-undergraduate students, decide to also help out and suggest a few strategies for the newcomers. And who will give you a better advice, if not a student who just went through the same thing.

All six writers have a different idea of how to make college life perfect. A couple of their ideas may sound a bit extreme to some people, like breaking up with your significant other, because your relationship will not last long in college anyways. Others suggest to get involved, join organizations, maybe do research. Expand your horizons and step out of your comfort zone.  Even though each one of them addresses a different issue, all come together to point out that it is important to get to know new people- both students and professors, in and outside the classroom setting. Their goal is to help the students who may be struggling a little with their new college setting, by sharing their own experiences and thoughts.

Each one of the six writers has their own way of making their argument; however all of them connect together somewhere. Tim Novikoff appeals to the reader’s humor, but also uses style to convey his message. When he advises students of what they should do, he lists a number of things that, in his opinion, are really worth doing in college. He mentions exploring your university, or doing things that you have always wanted to do. By making a list, he adds flow to his piece. It is a quick read, but full of ideas on how to have a great experience in college. Both Willie X. Lin and Evan LaLonde, advise the freshmen to step out of their comfort zones and face other people. Lin advises to, “meet people who are not professors or other students,” and LaLonde adds, “relax and enjoy the ride.” In their opinion, opening up to other students and people from the outside, is a great idea to get involved and just get used to the new life as a college student and to enjoy the experience. Moving on, Christine Smallwood and Rebecca Elliott, the only females in the crowd, argue that letting go of something that we are used to is a great idea to start college fresh and with no obligations. Smallwood suggests that separating yourself from the internet for a while can help you be a better student. She says that “by scheduling a few internet-free hours each day,” is the only way to fully concentrate on your work.  Elliot on the other hand, says that it is okay to dump your boyfriend, because it will only stress you out as the year goes by and you start making new friends. Each of the writers has their own different opinion, but all want to help out their younger friends as they start college.

Since all writers are giving tips to college freshmen, it would seem that the  the audience are in fact college freshman who may be a little lost or overwhelmed with the new setting. Their own experience as college students establishes credibility and trust. It also creates a student-to-student bond, which makes the audience feel understood because they are looking from the same point of view. Also, the tone of their pieces is understanding and kind, which indicates that they are really trying to share what they know to enhance the college experience of other students, who may be struggling at this point. However, since college students do not usually read the New York Times, the intended audience could be parents of college freshmen. They can influence their children in the decisions they make in college. Since the writers establish a very credible tone, parents would have to problem with taking their advices and passing them down to their kids.

The purpose of this article was to open up the eyes of some college freshmen; to let them know that college is more than just taking classes and studying for them. Either if they read this article themselves, or learn about it through their parents, they can use those advices as they make important choices in college. You have to look around you and see how many opportunities you have, in order to better your college experience. All six writers give their own examples and open you up to new possibilities and now it is the students’ responsibility to take those advices and put them into action.

Works Cited:

Novikoff, Tim, Willie X. Lin, Aman Singh Gill, Christine Smallwood, Evan LaLonde, and Rebecca Elliot. “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend.” The New York Times 26 Sept. 2010: 12. Print.

Everyone gets some kind of advices as they go off to college. Do this, don’t do that. Try this and that, but stay away from something else. Freshmen hear that all the time. College is a big change for a lot of students, so most of them really listen to everything other people tell them, and try to make the best use of it. Six current post-undergraduate students, decide to also help out and suggest a few strategies for the newcomers. And who will give you a better advice, if not a student who just went through the same thing.

All six writers have a different idea of how to make college life perfect. A couple of their ideas may sound a bit extreme to some people, like breaking up with your significant other, because your relationship will not last long in college anyways. Others suggest to get involved, join organizations, maybe do research. Expand your horizons and step out of your comfort zone.  Even though each one of them addresses a different issue, all come together to point out that it is important to get to know new people- both students and professors, in and outside the classroom setting. Their goal is to help the students who may be struggling a little with their new college setting, by sharing their own experiences and thoughts.

Each one of the six writers has their own way of making their argument; however all of them connect together somewhere. Tim Novikoff appeals to the reader’s humor, but also uses style to convey his message. When he advises students of what they should do, he lists a number of things that, in his opinion, are really worth doing in college. He mentions exploring your university, or doing things that you have always wanted to do. By making a list, he adds flow to his piece. It is a quick read, but full of ideas on how to have a great experience in college. Both Willie X. Lin and Evan LaLonde, advise the freshmen to step out of their comfort zones and face other people. In their opinion, opening up to other students and people from the outside, is a great idea to get involved and just get used to the new life as a college student. Moving on, Christine Smallwood and Rebecca Elliott, the only females in the crowd, argue that letting go of something that we are used to is a great idea to start college fresh and with no obligations. Smallwood suggests that separating yourself from the internet for a while can help you be a better student. Elliot on the other hand, says that it is okay to dump your boyfriend, because it will only stress you out as the year goes by and you start making new friends. Each of the writers has their own different opinion, but all want to help out their younger friends as they start college.

Therefore, the audience that the writers are trying to appeal to, are college freshman who may be a little lost or overwhelmed with the new setting. Their own experience as college students establishes credibility and trust. It also creates a student-to-student bond, which makes the audience feel understood because they are looking from the same point of view. Also, the tone of their pieces is understanding and kind, which indicates that they are really trying to share what they know to enhance the college experience of other students, who may be struggling at this point. However, since college students do not usually read the New York Times, the intended audience could be parents of college freshmen. They can influence their children in the decisions they make in college. Since the writers establish a very credible tone, parents would have to problem with taking their advices and passing them down to their kids.

The purpose of this article was to open up the eyes of some college freshmen; to let them know that college is more than just taking classes and studying for them. Either if they read this article themselves, or learn about it through their parents, they can use those advices as they make important choices in college. You have to look around you and see how many opportunities you have, in order to better your college experience. All six writers give their own examples and open you up to new possibilities, however you have to decide for yourself and maybe explore even more; find something that works perfect for you.

Works Cited:

Novikoff, Tim, Willie X. Lin, Aman Singh Gill, Christine Smallwood, Evan LaLonde, and Rebecca Elliot. “Ditch Your Laptop, Dump Your Boyfriend.” The New York Times 26 Sept. 2010: 12. Print.

Cowen, Tyler. “Can the Fed Offer A Reason to Cheer?” The New York Times 19 Sept. 2010: 5. Print.

In the business section of Sunday’s New York Times, Tyler Cowen claims that Americans have lost their optimism in our economy, and are not willing to spend as much money, which is actually not helping the financial situation that the Sates are facing right now. Author explains the problem by describing how the lack of spending money is affecting the economy, and at the same time he also quotes Ben S. Bernanke, the fed chairman. Cowen makes his argument in order to raise the awareness of the problem that we facing and to boost up the confidence. He assumes that his audience are businessmen, especially those who were affected by the financial crisis.